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A year later, Altfest and Ross had a prototype, which they called Project , an acronym for Technical Automated Compatibility Testing—New York City’s first computer-dating service. She was the station’s first female reporter, and she had chosen, as her début feature, a three-part story on how New York couples meet.Each client paid five dollars and answered more than a hundred multiple-choice questions. (A previous installment had been about a singles bar—Maxwell’s Plum, on the Upper East Side, one of the first that so-called “respectable” single women could patronize on their own.) She had planned to interview Altfest, but he was out of the office, and she ended up talking to Ross.The most right-swiped men claim to be pilots, founder/entrepreneurs, and firefighters, in that order, the list said.For women, most matches go to physical therapists, interior designers, and, again, founder/entrepreneurs. SWIPE the pages or TAP the arrows to move forward or back. In the fall of 1964, on a visit to the World’s Fair, in Queens, Lewis Altfest, a twenty-five-year-old accountant, came upon an open-air display called the Parker Pen Pavilion, where a giant computer clicked and whirred at the job of selecting foreign pen pals for curious pavilion visitors. Within a year, more than five thousand subscribers had signed on. It would invite dozens of matched couples to singles parties, knowing that people might be more comfortable in a group setting. They wound up in the pages of the New York subscriber.

Stitch helps adults over 50 find companionship online, and can be used by anyone via a web browser, tablet or smart phone.Anderson's article for "Wired" on this paradigm related to research on power law distribution models carried out by Clay Shirky, specifically in relation to bloggers.